Brand honesty: Stay humble. Hustle hard.

When all of marketing/advertising is promising the world or in an echo chamber...be the brand that is humble, honest and acknowledges the effort its put in to get where its at. 

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A little better. Never perfect.

Camper Shoes and production sustainability


When you meet someone, don’t you want to make a real connection? One where you bring your authenticity and perhaps a sneak peek at your willingness to be vulnerable. We bring this psychology to creative marketing too. You’ll see this approachable voice in new companies and products, but it’s uncommon to hear from a larger, global brand who has a reputation to uphold.

Honest Tea broke away from sugar-filled, ace-in-the-hole brightly colored Ready-To-Drink (RTD) beverage product setting a trend. Dave Dahl of Dave’s Killer Bread uncovered his story of incarceration and stuck to his unconventional recipe despite radical pricing, unproven recipe despite dysfunctional relationships in the family business. These are smaller companies without much to lose, but I especially appreciate those larger brands who can publicly recognize they aren’t the bosses anymore and still must work hard to keep a loyal customer.

Camper stands independently. Quirky comfortable shoes with an individualistic flair. Dedicated to sustainable production practices and invested in ecological technologies, their story is real. Camper works hard to conduct a profitable business and be true to the impact it has on the earth, but freely admits, even shouts, that they’re not doing a good enough job. If more companies were this honest about their efforts instead of broadcasting their (barely proven) good deeds, you’ll see them deepen the connection with those that care. The audience who listens and rewards honest behavior with honest brand loyalty.

Luxury brands, such as Puma and Hugo Boss, using  Piñatex  material fail to invest in educating the public on the damage our consumer goods create. What is the balance between eliminating leather usage and jumping on the bandwagon to increase revenue?

Luxury brands, such as Puma and Hugo Boss, using Piñatex material fail to invest in educating the public on the damage our consumer goods create. What is the balance between eliminating leather usage and jumping on the bandwagon to increase revenue?